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    Dear Edith

    Dear Edith: Modesty & Being Desirable

    Dear Edith Modesty and being desirable question -- FemCatholic.comDear Edith Modesty and being desirable question -- FemCatholic.com

    Dear Edith,

    I’ve always been been a thicker girl, between sizes 14-18. My husband loves that about me and he definitely likes when I flaunt my curves a little more. It’s not that he wants me walking down the street in my underwear; but he’d prefer a bikini at the beach/pool, a form hugging dress for a night out, no maxi skirts, and clothes that show off my curves in general.

    What wife doesn’t want their husband to find them desirable?

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    Discussions on Divorce: What We’re Leaving Out

    Divorce & What we're leaving out -- FemCatholic.com

    Discussions on divorce in Catholic circles tend to focus on two points: 1) pastoral care for divorced persons in the Church and 2) the question of (not) permitting divorced and remarried Catholics to receive Holy Communion. As members of the body of Christ, we need to ask these questions and properly care for divorced Catholics. At the same time, there is a sobering void in our discussions. We are quick to state how deeply divorce hurts children, but we are largely silent when it comes to how we can help them.

    We are quick to state how deeply divorce hurts children, but we are largely silent when it comes to how we can help them.

    The truly efficacious grace given to me during the sacrament of Confirmation is, I am convinced, what kept me in the Church. One year after my Confirmation, my parents told me they were getting divorced. I sought comfort and healing in the Church, spent more time at my parish than before their divorce, and never missed Mass on Sundays. How I wish my situation were the rule and not the exception.

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    Modern Catholic Women

    Stronger than darkness: The call to respond to racism

    The Call to Respond to Racism -- FemCatholic.com

    I could not believe my eyes when I sat on my bed, on a typical Saturday morning in Charlottesville, scrolling through my newsfeed on Facebook.

    All that I saw were videos of protesters, carrying torches and marching in a line, down the lawn of the University of Virginia, my university, in the dead of night.

    I knew that the Unite the Right white supremacist rally was going to take place in Emancipation Park later in the day, but I had no idea that this evil would be marching less than one mile away from my apartment in the dead of night.  

    I had no idea that this evil would be marching less than one mile away from my apartment in the dead of night.

    The next twenty-four hours were spent on lockdown alone in my apartment, with my eyes glued to a livestream of the news on my laptop while all of Virginia was in a state of emergency. A white supremacy rally had turned into large scale riots, violence had out-broken between the supremacists and protesters, policemen were struggling to clear the crowd, and a car was driven by a white supremacist down a crowded street, killing a woman and injuring others. The places where I had the past three years laughing with my friends was full of carnage, evil, and terrorism.

    The following day I walked straight into my university parish and asked the chaplain, “What happened and what now?”

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    Modern Catholic Women

    Contributor Convo: Notre Dame and the Contraceptive Mandate

    Contributor Convo: Notre Dame and the Contraceptive Mandate -- FemCatholic.com

    Faithful Catholic feminists, discussing tough issues.

    ♦♦♦

    Recently the Trump Administration rolled back the Affordable Care Act’s birth control mandate – allowing organizations to refuse “no questions asked” coverage of birth control on the grounds of religious freedom. The University of Notre Dame is among the most prominent organizations to announce it will be utilizing this religious exemption, and dropping birth control coverage for women without a medical need.


    THE PRO SIDE: Agreeing with Notre Dame’s decision to drop contraception coverage

    By Samantha Povlock 

    To start off, it’s important to note that there are a whole list of reasons why the so-called ACA “Contraceptive Mandate” is ineffective at promoting women’s freedom and health.

    But as a feminist, a Catholic, and an alumna of Notre Dame myself, I wanted to respond specifically to the discussion I’ve seen around the University’s decision, and to challenge the most common claims I’ve seen for why this decision is an attack on women.

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    10 Ways Physician-Assisted Suicide Targets Women

    10 ways physician assisted suicide targets women -- FemCatholic.com

    As our country considers new legislation on patients’ rights and healthcare, physician-assisted suicide will undoubtedly join the conversation.

    Physician-Assisted Suicide, or PAS, occurs when a doctor provides a patient with the means to commit suicide by prescription medication.

    It’s currently legal in California, Oregon, Washington, Vermont, Colorado, Montana, and Washington, DC. 

    This isn’t just an ethical issue, it’s a feminist one.

    Most “right-to-die” legislation includes provisions to protect a patient’s autonomy in this decision — such as minimum age of 18, a terminal diagnosis with six months or less to live, multiple requests for assisted suicide, and a mental evaluation.

    When Montana legalized PAS, it was determined by the State Supreme Court (Baxter v. Montana), which mentioned “competent” and “terminally ill” in its ruling, but failed to define these terms or specify patient protections. With so little regulation, a patient might be more easily pressured into thinking suicide is her best, or only, choice.

    Ethical reservations about PAS include this concern, that external pressures could push patients toward an unwanted suicide.

    And several cultural norms in the United States indicate a woman may experience more external pressure than a man to hasten her own death.

    So this isn’t just an ethical issue, it’s a feminist one. Here are 10 reasons why:

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    Modern Catholic Women

    The real power in a sexy Halloween costume

    The real power behind a sexy halloween costume -- FemCatholic.com

    It’s that time of year again.

    sexy halloween costume catholic women

    Ladies be lining up like:

    sexy halloween costume catholic women

    Sexy Wonder Woman, Sexy Santa, even Sexy Taco Sauce packets — the options are endless.

    Unless of course, you’re too hipster for that.

    sexy halloween costumes catholic women

    But even if you generally dress pretty modestly, you can’t deny, there’s something really… powerful about getting dolled up so… sexy.

    sexy halloween costume catholic women

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    Modern Catholic Women

    #MeToo: A Catholic story of trust, hurt, and healing

    #MeToo: A Catholic story -- FemCatholic.com

    Names have been changed.

    Sexual abuse allegations against Harvey Weinstein have caused many people to come forward with their own assault stories, all tagging their social media posts with the hashtag “#metoo”.

    These stories of assault are coming from everyone, everywhere.

    Actresses and actors, olympic gymnasts, friends and family on my feeds. All of these posts have reminded me of my own story, when I learned that the unfortunate reality is that just because someone is Catholic, doesn’t make them infallible.

    Me too, and I let it affect my relationship with God.

    ♦♦♦

    A few years ago, I had just moved into a new town, a new parish. I was starting to get to know people, and everyone was very kind. I had just been broken up with and was not looking for a casual situation where I was going to get hurt. I was looking for something serious, and respectful. I was looking for someone Catholic.

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